April 10, 2020
  • 12:45 pm Wembley to Willesden Junction Healthy Streets
  • 3:06 pm New report calls for step-change in way Brent Council deals with air pollution
  • 6:00 pm Cycle Storage
  • 12:24 pm Forty Lane/Blackbird Hill Proposed Road Safety Improvements
  • 7:52 pm Fryent Way Proposed Crossing Upgrade
  • 8:25 pm Kingsbury Road East of Church Lane Peak Time Bus Lane Proposals
  • 5:51 pm Church Lane NW9 Proposed Road Safety improvements
A404 Unhealthy Streets | Brent Cycling Campaign

Transport for London (TfL) and the London Borough of Brent are working together to develop Healthy Streets improvements between Wembley and Willesden Junction, including the town centres of Wembley, Stonebridge and Harlesden. These changes would make it easier and safer to walk, cycle, and use public transport in the area. Making the area safer, greener and reducing car travel. Jump to our FAQs below (broadly based on TfL content).

The area along the A404 that will benefit from these Healthy Streets improvements

In this area, every year, people are seriously injured, some fatally. This cannot go on, and the Mayor has set a target to reduce the number of deaths and serious injuries on London’s roads to zero by 2041. We are inviting local people to tell us how they currently travel around the area and what changes they would like us to make that would help and encourage more people to choose active travel options in the community.

This first period of engagement is running until Sunday 22 March and early involvement in the process is very important as design will be built on the feedback received from local people.

You can arrange a feedback session with TfL’s Community & Partnerships Specialist, Transport Strategy & Planning, Julie Camacho on wembleywillesdenjct@tfl.gov.uk, and register your comments and suggestions by responding online by Sunday 22 March.

Healthy Streets FAQs

The Healthy Streets Approach puts people, and their health, at the heart of decision making. This results in a healthier, more inclusive city where people choose to walk, cycle and use public transport.

The Healthy Streets Approach is not an idealised vision for a model street. It is a long-term plan for improving Londoners’ and visitors’ experiences of our streets, helping everyone to be more active and enjoy the health benefits of being on our streets.

Healthy Streets | Brent Cycling Campaign

80% of Londoners’ travel happens on our streets. The best way to get more people out walking, cycling and using public transport is to improve the quality of the experience of being on those streets. The Healthy Streets Approach focuses on creating streets that are pleasant, safe and attractive, where noise, air pollution, accessibility and lack of seating and shelter are not barriers that prevent people – particularly our most vulnerable people – from getting out and about. More information about Healthy Streets can be found on the TfL website.

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Communities across London have told us that they want to be engaged at an earlier stage, so that plans for local improvements reflect input from residents and businesses from the very start of design. We therefore want to invite feedback at this early stage of our planning to help us better understand local priorities and people’s views on what can be improved in their communities, before we develop any proposals.
As part of our engagement strategy we are dedicating eight weeks to gaining early feedback from the public and key stakeholders, and this feedback will be used to inform the development of design proposals jointly with Brent Council. Subject to technical assessments including traffic modelling, we expect to run a formal public consultation in late 2020/ early 2021.

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The A404 which passes through Wembley and Harlesden town centres is currently heavily congested with motor vehicles, which causes pollution, travel delays and contributes to unacceptable numbers of people being killed or seriously injured on these roads every year. Between 2015 and 2018 there were 312 collisions along this corridor in Brent (1 fatal, 27 serious and 284 slight injured). Air pollution affects all road users and is particularly damaging to children.

Significant population growth is also expected in this area with several housing developments currently in progress, which will mean increased travel in the area. So there is a need to provide alternative safe and healthy travel options to help people to get around and to ease congestion. We also know from our analysis that many of the car journeys made in this part of London are short car trips that could reasonably be walked or cycled if the streets were made more attractive for these modes. Because of this, TfL’s Strategic Cycling Analysis has identified the corridor between Wembley and Willesden Junction as being one of the top 25 in London for future cycling potential.

We want to help make London the world’s most attractive and healthy city by improving air quality, encouraging physical activity, reducing the dominance of motorised traffic and making London a greener and more pleasant place to live in line with the Mayor’s Transport Strategy. We aim to connect communities, reduce road danger, enhance local life, and enable and encourage more people to walk, cycle and use public transport.

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According to the latest medical advice, a person who is active every day is less likely to suffer from heart disease, depression and many other debilitating or harmful illnesses. Walking and cycling is the easiest way to lead a more active lifestyle and contributes to the Mayor’s target to ensure all Londoners do at least 20 minutes of activity daily by 2041, and also helps to meet the pressing need to improve the quality of London’s air.

Poor air quality affects the health of everyone and Brent Council is committed to taking action to meet targets to reduce air pollution in the borough. In response to this clear evidence, TfL has adopted the Healthy Streets Approach to managing London’s transport network. This aims to improve air quality, reduce the dominance of motorised traffic and make London a greener, healthier and more pleasant place to live. It does so by prioritising evidence-based measures which would encourage people to walk, cycle or use public transport.

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We have been working with the London Borough of Brent to identify initiatives to enable people to walk and cycle more often along the corridor between Wembley and Willesden Junction, which passes through the neighbourhoods of Wembley, Tokyngton, Stonebridge, Harlesden, and Kensal Green. This scheme would form an important part of the Mayor’s Transport Strategy and is guided by the Mayor’s Healthy Streets Approach, which aims to encourage more sustainable travel and to make London greener, healthier and more pleasant.

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By far the biggest reason why more Londoners don’t cycle is fear of traffic: 46% of Londoners are put off cycling by a fear of collisions, and 25% are discouraged because of poor road conditions. Traffic and road danger also puts Londoners off from walking: 21% of Londoners say that too much traffic is a barrier to walking, and 14% per cent say traffic travelling too fast is what stops them walking more.

TfL and the Mayor are therefore investing in Brent’s street environment to make it easier and safer for people to walk and cycle to work, school, or the local town centres and amenities. By providing the infrastructure to make cycling and walking trips safer and more attractive, and to reduce intimidation caused by traffic, we can enable a large number of trips to switch to active travel. Our investment in cycle lanes has been effective in growing cycling, for example cycling levels have increased by 52 per cent on the A105 Green Lanes in Enfield (2016-2018). Cycleways have become an important part of London’s transport network but there is much more we can do to make London a more active city for all.

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We want Londoners to think about the journeys they are making, and consider whether they could walk, cycle or use public transport for some trips. For example, two-thirds of car trips in London could be walked or cycled in under 20 minutes. It’s also worth remembering that 50% of households in Brent do not own a car. And yet, the vast majority of road space is catered towards those who do. This has a detrimental impact on everybody’s health and wellbeing.

The Mayor’s Transport Strategy has committed to prioritising walking, cycling and public transport over private car use. A shift away from the car can help address many of London’s health problems by increasing physical activity, improving air quality, and helping to reduce road danger. It will also help limit the city’s contribution to climate change and help to create more attractive local environments. It will reconnect communities by creating places where people are prioritised over cars and revitalise local high streets by creating more attractive urban centres for businesses and their employees.

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The Mayor has outlined plans to improve accessibility on the public transport network by providing improved accessibility training to bus drivers, reviewing bus design, continuing to upgrade bus stops, providing step-free access at more rail and Underground stations and giving consideration to those with both visible and invisible disabilities in station and train design. We are confident that these improvements will mean that everyone can use London’s public transport network.

We are also improving accessibility by enhancing London’s streets to enable disabled and older people to more easily travel spontaneously and independently by walking and cycling. We know that London’s street environments shape how people choose to travel, and we want to create streets which everyone feels are inclusive and accessible for cycling and walking.

According to TfL, 12% of Disabled people cycle regularly or occasionally, compared to 17% of non-Disabled people. And the annual survey by Wheels for Wellbeing shows that ¾ use their cycle as a mobility aid. You an find out more about people with disabilities and cycling from Wheels for Wellbeing Guide to Inclusive Cycling.

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We will consider the needs of all road users including those of people walking and will consider safety and landscape improvements for walking and place making wherever possible. This may include new and upgraded pedestrian crossings, improved streetscape such as paving, planting, and seating, and other improvements in line with the Mayor’s Healthy Streets approach.

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We want to understand how businesses deliver their goods and how parking and loading is accessed or not. We will use site surveys to assess the usage of parking and loading bays and will aim to minimise the impacts on businesses and deliveries.

We know that 75 per cent of congestion on London’s roads is caused simply by there being too great a demand for limited street space. By encouraging more people to walk, cycle and use public transport for their journeys, which are more space-efficient modes of travel, we can maximise road capacity and enable London’s roads to be more reliable for freight, services and other essential journeys made by motorised vehicles.

Cycle parking is also more economically efficient than car parking: one car parking space can hold up to eight cycles, resulting in a higher spend per square meter.

The Street Appeal report, developed by UCL on TfL’s behalf, studies the impact of improvements to the street environment in London town centres and high streets.

The research found that street improvements return substantial benefits to the users of the streets, including local businesses and people visiting the area. For example, the study found a 17% decline in retail vacancy rates between improved and unimproved streets.

Read the full report:

street-appeal

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When considering the impact of new cycle lanes and bus lane changes, traffic must be considered in the context of all people using the road, not just those using private cars. Sustainable modes of transport such as cycling and buses make much more efficient use of our limited road space, and by prioritising these we are able to make our roads operate more efficiently.

Following this engagement period we will develop plans and carry out detailed traffic modelling to assess potential journey time impacts for all modes of traffic. We will work to minimise any journey time impacts and will share this information during the formal public consultation. Bus demand in this area is high so we recognise the need to maintain and where possible improve current bus speeds.

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To accommodate new facilities there may be some changes to bus lanes and bus stops, however we will aim to minimise the impacts for bus passengers and seek opportunities to improve bus accessibility wherever possible.

There may also be changes to some bus stop layouts, road alignment, inset bays, and introduction of continued protected cycle facilities past bus stops, such as bus stop bypasses, to help people cycling avoid interactions with
vehicles. We are keen to maintain or enhance bus infrastructure within this scheme and others. We need to ensure buses can turn, stand and pick up / set down passengers in accordance with the demands of the network. Find out more about bus bypasses.

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We are in the process of producing an Equality Impact Assessment (EqIA). This will be available in time for the consultation in late 2020 / early 2021. We want to hear what people with protected characteristics think about road access, parking, public transport facilities in their areas and this can help inform our EqIA. The EqIA helps us consider the needs of people with protected characteristics, using research and feedback from previous engagement, when designing improvements.

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The area we are considering for these improvements was identified based on expected future levels of people cycling. The exact corridor alignment will be considered following pre-engagement and would most likely be a mix of main roads and quiet back streets, with infrastructure proposed as appropriate to the street environment.

The facility will accommodate both people who already cycle as well as encouraging new people to take up active travel. Our approach is to provide cycling facilities on main roads so that we can cater sufficiently for the expected future number of people cycling, while also providing sufficient protection from traffic. This makes it easy for people to get between town centres and access the shops and amenities they need to visit which are usually located along main roads and high streets.

Direct and convenient routes are key to make cycling or walking the obvious choice of mode of transport for short local trips, resulting in our high streets being more pleasant, safer and less polluted.

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By 2041 London’s population is expected to grow to 10.5 million people, generating an additional 5 million trips per day. This is equivalent to a car load of people moving to London every 40 minutes and will place significant additional pressure on our public transport networks.

The success of London’s future transport system relies upon using the space we have more efficiently, by reducing car use and increasing use of walking, cycling and public transport. A bike uses only one fifth the amount of road space as a car, making it the most efficient use of road-space aside from buses. One bus with average occupancy uses road space around four times more efficiently than cars; a fully-laden bus is 19 times more efficient than cars as a user of road space.

Many Londoners already travel more actively: every day, around 6.7 million trips are made solely on foot and 745,000 trips by cycle. However, it is estimated that almost 5 million journeys per day that could be walked or cycled are currently made by car.

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It is simply not the case that building cycle lanes damages local business. Research by London Business Improvement Districts (source: Survey of London BIDS )shows that improving streets for walking and cycling increases the vibrancy of an area and communities, and encourages people to spend more in their local shops (source Survey of London BIDs).

On average, people who walk, cycle or use public transport to access town
centres spend up to 30 per cent more than those who drive. We also know that although businesses may consider that their customers come by car, the majority of people actually get to them by walking, cycling or using public transport. This is well evidenced in the UK and globally.

We have seen some examples across London, such as Venner Road in Waltham Forest, where reducing car access and making it easier to walk and cycle has given the high street a big boost, with more shops opening and making the area more community-friendly. We have information on our website about the economic benefits of walking and cycling, with data from a range of sources including academics, other transport authorities, Government departments and businesses.

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We want to ensure that London’s streets are safe and accessible for everyone who wants to cycle, and that cycling becomes a realistic choice for more people. Our research has highlighted the main reasons why people currently choose not to cycle in London, and our investment in cycling is targeted at helping break down these barriers for more Londoners.

Road danger is the number one barrier to cycling, and these improvements will help less confident people to feel safer to cycle. We also know that many Londoners who would like to cycle can’t cycle yet, or don’t feel confident enough to start. For these people, London Borough of Brent offers free Cycle training. More information can be found on the Council’s cycling website. There are adapted bikes for disabled people, and organisations like Wheels for Wellbeing can help with training. According to TfL, 12% of Disabled people cycle regularly or occasionally, compared to 17% of non-Disabled people. And the annual survey by Wheels for Wellbeing shows that ¾ use their cycle as a mobility aid. You an find out more about people with disabilities and cycling from Wheels for Wellbeing’s Guide to Inclusive Cycling. Cargobikes can transport young children as well as bulky items and cargo trike can help people with balance issue, providing independent mobility and active travel levels that benefit physical and mental health.

Find out more about the potential of cycling beyond the standard two wheels for one person on Beyond The Bicycle Coalition website.

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People using all modes of travel can at times behave inconsiderately. The built environment influences behaviour regardless of the mode of transport used. Providing safe walking and cycling facilities is an important dimension in encouraging considerate behaviour as well as creating a space for everyone to safely enjoy. The Metropolitan police and the Met Cycle Task Force carry out regular operations to enforce obedience to the rules.

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Cycling and walking improvements are funded from a variety of sources – including the GLA’s council tax precept and fares revenue, both of which people who cycle pay.

Road tax has not existed since 1937. Instead people who own cars pay Vehicle Excise Duty, which is based on how polluting a vehicle is. As cycles do not pollute, they are not charged for VED, just like motorists don’t pay VED for their low emission or electric vehicle. VED revenue raised gets paid into the Government’s consolidation fund, which then goes towards funding a range of activities – this could be towards defence or education. There is no direct link between VED and constructing or maintaining roads.

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People from a range of backgrounds already choose to cycle and we want to make sure all Londoners feel they can do this as a way of getting around. As a healthy and relatively affordable mode of transport, cycling can benefit everyone.

We want people to feel that cycling is a normal everyday mode of transport they can choose to get to their nearby shops, cafés, schools and community facilities. By tackling people’s barriers to cycling such as a lack of safe cycling infrastructure, secure cycle parking, or not feeling confident on a bike, we hope to enable more people to cycle in future.

Our research tells us that the barriers to cycling, in particular road danger, are particularly acute for groups who are currently under-represented in cycling, such as women, children and BAME people.

Our investment in cycling is aimed at breaking down barriers felt by these groups. This goes beyond providing infrastructure and includes local initiatives to break down barriers to cycling in communities and promote cycling to more Londoners. For example, TfL funds London boroughs to train both children and adults to cycle, and we have targets for 33,000 children and 55,000 adults to be trained each year. They also have walking and cycling community grants, which funds community groups that help people walk and cycle more. This year grants awarded included to groups supporting homeless people, Muslim women and those with mental health issues.

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No. Evidence shows this to be untrue. Motorised road transport is a significant source of nitrous oxide (Nox) and particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5) emissions in London. We must continue to reduce these emissions by enabling more Londoners to choose walking, cycling and public transport for their journeys, as the most obvious and convenient way to move around.

Improved cycling facilities are designed to make cycling safer and ensure we make more efficient use of limited road space in London. They have helped increase the capacity on some of London’s critical road corridors. For example, monitoring data from Upper Thames Street along the East – West Cycleway continues to show reducing levels of PM10 in in both 2017 and 2018. In Waltham Foresti there was a 5 per cent increase in the total number of people travelling in the peak hour following the introduction of segregated cycle lanes.

By encouraging more people to choose sustainable and space-efficient modes of transport, we can ensure that London’s roads will be more reliable for freight, services and other essential journeys made by motorised modes. We also take measures to reduce the impact Healthy
Streets schemes in the final, completed state and also during the construction stages. This includes the planning of works to minimise impact on buses, cyclist and pedestrians through careful phasing wherever possible.

TfL works with its contractors to carry out more work during quieter periods such as school holidays, overnight and school hours only, according to the constraints of the project. Where needed, additional buses may be provided to maintain frequency on routes experiencing delays due to works. Improvements are urgently needed to ensure we build an environment that is suitable for the next generation as well as people living in the area. This includes doing everything possible to reduce road danger, passive travel and toxic emissions. It’s a public health issue.

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Please email wembleywillesdenjct@tfl.gov.uk if you have any questions, comments or suggestions.

Alternatively, you can also write to on at FREEPOST TFL FEEDBACK
Or visit our website for more information https://tfl.gov.uk/modes/cycling/routes-andmaps/cycleways

At Brent Cycling Campaign, we are always happy to speak to community groups or residents associations to alleviate any concerns or discuss further these points. Do not hesitate to contact us.

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1 COMMENTS

  1. brian ditchburn Posted on March 19, 2020 at 5:53 pm

    I cycle regularly between Willesden and Putney. This takes me down scubs lane, past wood lane with cars and ubers pullin into both the new BBC television centre development and expansion of westfield, then through Sheppards Bush -traveling north in four lanes of traffic and cars converging from the west at the lights on the south side of Sheppards Bush. Then round Hammersmith roundabout again no segregation from four lanes of traffic. Then south past the hospital (more ubers pulling into the hospital) then finally down fullham palace road – usually not too stressfull

    Reply
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